I Can’t Believe You Don’t Eat Butter

 Flojo’s Easy Detox Tip #3

OK, this is a supadupa easy tip. Stop buying margarine, spreadable “butter” and any fancy schmancy low-fat, cholesterol-reducing, poly-whoodyamaflip tubs of yellow gunk! And, before you ask, even that one. And that one! Sorry, that ones gotta go too. I know it says pure/organic/healthy on the side. It’s still no good for you.

I don’t care what claims that crap makes on the side of its plastic tub; humans did perfectly well on good old butter from organically raised, pasture raised cattle for – like – ever without replacing it with bleached, purified, chemically interfered with, heated (and so damaged) artificial and additive-laden muck. The blame for the downturn in the general population’s collective health can largely be left at the door of the fake butter-peddling industry’s doors. And don’t be fooled by actual butter with “traditional values” packaging either. The nutritional content still doesn’t compare. A bit of research into seeing what commercial dairy herds are fed, how they are raised and how they are treated should put you right off.

Butter from organically raised dairy herds is the bomb! It has a great Omega 3 to 6 ratio, higher levels of vitamins D & K, more CLA (linked to weight loss) and tastes so much better than spreadable rubbish or inferior butter. Butter is a magnificent accompaniment to steaming plates of broccoli, asparagus or kale while carrots or cabbage sliced and gently fried in butter are far tastier than boiled. Not only does veg taste better with butter but the fat soluble vitamins,  such as A and D become more bio-available once served with the rich  golden stuff. In the meantime, I am more than happy to let my daughters eat it by the slice, happy in the knowledge that it’s a bonafide health food in its own right.

Further Reading:

Soil Association Definition of Organic Dairy Farming

Mark Sisson: Is All Butter Created Equal?

Winging It Without Waste

I am a (charmingly) chaotic cook. I think about main meals about an hour before I need to serve them up. Breakfast surprises even myself each morning; I get it on the table pretty much before my brain has woken up! Furthermore my shopping lists rarely contain much more than a reminder to pick up loo roll and I have not ever written a meal plan unless it was for Christmas Day. One year I didn’t even plan that but spent a lovely few hours pottering in the kitchen with my veggie box while the others watched Mary Poppins and we still feasted on a glorious roast with ALL the trimmings.

Recently I’ve been trawling through countless zero waste blogs and the most common advice where food is concerned seems to revolve around planning. Which got me thinking because we haven’t ever needed to use our council-provided food-waste box. So, for those of you that are perpetual wingers of the kitchen arena, here is how I do it!

Get a regular organic delivery. Organic food lovingly raised, harvested or produced tends to be on the expensive side. While it’s easy to chuck out a bag of discounted supermarket pre-prepped veggies gone to mush, I defy you to forget about that proud head of kale that takes up half your fridge. And because a) it tastes so much better and b) is seasonal – meaning you aren’t bored of using the same produce month-in-month-out it’s more exciting to use. In addition, I find our locally grown, non-air freighted, non Modified Atmosphere Packaged veggies stay fresh much longer anyway. Probably because they actually are fresh!

Don’t buy crap. Self explanatory really! If you buy crap you are unlikely to have much appetite or respect for it. So, unless you are a junk food binger (I’m not judging, I’ve been there) you probably won’t want to eat it all. And you probably don’t want to force feed it to anyone else either. And your compost bin won’t want it. So instead you hold it in your hand going what the hell did I buy this for? And, with no sensible answer other than it was on offer and I was PMSing and I just wanted to get out of the shop with the bright lights and other peoples screaming children and get home to have a cup of tea you chuck it out. Because it isn’t food. It’s crap.

Learn to improvise. I’d never have the ingredients I’d need if I followed recipes. But I do love cookery books for the inspiration. Most evenings I just grab some meat out of our tiny fridge (hopefully I remembered to defrost something the night before!), chop up whichever veg looks like it needs using up sooner rather than later and then decide which herbs, spices or sauces will complete the dish. Here are some examples:

Raise non-picky kids. I made a deal with myself when our girls were young. I would cook good, healthy, delicious meals and expect them to either eat them or go without. They love their food and it is rare that they don’t finish what’s on their plates.
Raise non-picky pets. Once a week Simon prepares a large bowl of raw meat, eggs (including the shells), yoghurt and vegetables for Ella-the-dog and Poppy-the-cat. This gets divided into five portions (for one meal a day) and then they get raw bones, chicken gizzards, the pickings from the stock bones and any pan-scrapings or leftovers to top up or fill in the gaps. Until recently we’ve also always had free-range rabbits that got the cores and outer leaves of leafy veg like cabbages and the ends of root veg  like carrot tops. These bits now either get given to the dog or added to the compost bin.

The compost bin is a last resort and takes on any veg peelings that the pets don’t want; copious coffee grounds; tea bags, egg shells, the grotty bits from the sink strainer that fits in the plughole, the meat bones, and all of the egg boxes, paper and cardboard (largely used to package our organic veg) that we’ve used. In return we get great garden compost for free!

And that, my friends, is how we roll. Is there anything I haven’t covered? What are your top tips for winging it without waste?

Liver Hash

 I’m always on the lookout for liver recipes. I have a strong tendency to become anaemic, and liver provides a great source of easily absorbed iron, which in turn makes me marginally less inclined to drowsiness at certain times of the month. So this relatively mild tasting lambs offal is in our weekly organic delivery from Riverford and thus features regularly on the weekend menu!

This is a pretty undemanding way to both cook and consume lambs liver. If the taste is still a bit strong for you feel free to stir it into a big bowl of rice.
First you’ll want to trim the liver (organic every time) of any membranes and stringy bits – give them to your meat-eating pets who will noisily knock it back in the manner of the wolves and wild-cats they dream themselves to be while they doze on downy divans. Then chop the liver into bite size pieces and toss in gluten-free flour seasoned with salt, pepper and something spicy like Cajun seasoning. Fry some onions in plenty of butter or coconut oil until soft then add courgette and give it another ten minutes. Next some kale (pictured is Black Russian kale but curly kale or Savoy cabbage would be great too) and then push all the veggies to the outside of the frying pan. Turn your heat up high and pop the liver in the centre of the pan to brown on all sides. You want each cube to be lightly crispy on the outside and only-just-cooked on the inside. Like a Daim bar. But not. All done? Just stir it up, add extra seasoning if you like and serve. Fifteen minutes altogether I reckon, and a darn tasty way to get your inner-wild-animal revved up and ready to go.

Related post

Loving Liver?

Slow Cooked Curry

 I bought a slow cooker on Monday; it was an impulse buy but I mostly wanted something I could do the weekly chicken broth with. Slow cookers are the ultimate paleo/primal/ancestral and yet totally modern convenience right?! Yeah but no but. I quickly felt really bad because I’m trying to not buy, um, stuff at the moment and figured I should try and allay my guilt, assuage my remorse and alleviate my shame. (I love my thesaurus, I’ve had it twenty five years and the spine has long disintegrated. Whenever the pages or a chunk of pages fall out they get shoved back in the wrong place. There is now a minimal adherence to the rules of the alphabet.) I fear I may have digressed… Um, where was I?

Curry! I made a curry. I made a curry in my new crockpot. I ran round to the local shop, horribly aware that this was a slow cooker and it was only four hours until dinner time, and grabbed stewing steak and sweet potatoes. I browned off one and chopped the other. Threw them with reckless abandon into the crockpot with curry powder, chopped onion, chopped courgette, salt, pepper, some water and a big chunk of butter before switching the dial to high and waiting…
After two hours it was barely warm.

After three hours the occasional bubble blipped up to the surface.

My family arrived home with cries of: “What on earth is that?” “Isn’t that what old people have?” and “I thought we weren’t spending any money!

After three and a half hours I started boiling rice and wondering if I’d have to try and prepare something else.

After four hours elapsed I served up a perfect curry. I mean, it was truly sublime. Each morsel a tender, tasty testament to TLC. Everyone had seconds. Simon and I had leftovers for the next day’s lunch. I am, right now, wishing I could quickly cook some more. But it would take too long…

Incidentally, the freebie recipes that came with the slow cooker looked wack so please, please give me your favourite ideas in the comments!