Nourish, Align, Transform

Nourish, Align, Transform

I’ve been thinking about the reasons that more people might not sign up with a health and nutrition coach and talking to friends and colleagues about it. Turns out there’s quite a few! So I’ve decided to blog a short series of posts committing some of those thoughts and conversations to written words – I hope you find them interesting!

To start this series off I want to give you an idea of how I personally coach – I can’t talk for all health and nutrition coaches because we won’t all be coming from the same place in terms of training, experience and fields of expertise.

My belief is that the majority of health challenges come from a place of excessive stress and that the biggest stress of all is for anyone not to be person they were born to be.

I refer to my coaching practice as Nourish, Align, Transform. While every client programme is different (for the simple reason that every client is different!) if you were going to sign up with me the following should give you an idea of how our work together might look…

NOURISH

From the very first consultation I’ll be looking at helping you to increase time-honoured foods and practices that truly nourish you. We’ll be looking at what your ancestors thrived on in terms of nutrients, sunlight and sleep. We’ll look at what your health patterns since birth were trying to tell you in terms of what you actually needed in order to feel sustained, content and happy. And we’ll go through your current symptoms to figure what your unique physiology requires right now in order to feel energised and revitalised.

It is likely that I’ll be recommending abundant seasonal vegetables served with plenty of butter; an increase in delicious, traditionally-prepared and nutrient-dense real food; and a ban on margarine. You may be surprised to see an increase in salt, sunbathing and saturated fat. And I will be showing you how coffee, chocolate and cholesterol are not the demons the media makes them out to be.

You’ll also find out the difference between using targeted, quality supplements as therapeutic healing agents and taking generic multivitamins as a just-in-case measure. And I won’t ever ask you to count calories!

ALIGN

Everyone is, whether knowingly or not, affected by the seasons, the moon phases and their own twenty four hour circadian rhythms. Women are also particularly influenced by the phases of the menarche, of menstruation cycles, of motherhood and by the menopause. In my coaching practice I teach clients how these patterns cause hormone fluctuations which require adapted nutrient intakes and lifestyle changes in order to become truly balanced and in-the-flow.

The more we turn away from the nutrition, movement, sunlight, fresh air and sleep patterns that sustained our ancestors for thousands of years; and the more we rely on processed food, gym routines, artificial lighting, air-conditioning and disrupted sleep, then the more pressure we put on our health, and particularly our stress hormones.

Without taking a “hair-shirt” approach I make recommendations as to how to apply an ancestral approach to modern living in order to help our health become more aligned with that of our own life cycles, the seasons, and of the environment itself.

TRANSFORM

When you learn to eat and live in a way that honours your unique heritage, that allows your body to regain balance, and that clears your head from brain-fog, depression and constant anxiety you pave the way for profound changes to take place!

True healing means that you gain the strength to leave behind old expectations and unhealthy paradigms; and to live in a way that aligns with your beliefs, your passions and your hopes and dreams.

Good health isn’t simply the releasing of bad health.

It’s waking up with enthusiasm and vitality and getting a satisfyingly sound night’s sleep.

It’s getting to actually enjoy your meals rather than using food as a tool.

It’s enjoying your day, knowing that you can overcome whatever challenges get thrown at you.

It’s the sparkle in your eye, the smoulder in your smile, the strength in your constitution and the spring in your step.

It’s about thriving rather than just surviving.

I’d like to ask you a favour! Would you leave some of your thoughts in the comments as to why you personally would not seek out support from a health and nutrition coach?

However, if you would like to work with me to discover your unique path to nourishing, aligning and transforming yourself then please contact me here to arrange a consultation!

Advertisements
Free eBook!

Free eBook!

Hello lovelies!

March was a busy month… I don’t know if you are familiar with Chinese Five Elements theory, but Spring is governed by the element Wood, which is characterised by upward moving energy – rather like a sapling growing fast in pursuit of sunlight. Well, my creative and planning energy is quickly rising along with that metaphorical tree growth and I’m finding that my health and nutrition coaching practice is taking on a life of its own right now! There are a number of projects that I’ll be able to tell you about over the next few months, but for now – these are some of the things that I got up to during March:

But, maybe rather more excitingly, I wrote my first ever eBook, a freebie (a freebE-book?!) on how to get a good night’s sleep! In it I talk about the reasons you (or your partner or your kids etc.) aren’t sleeping and then provide some easy to follow solutions. And, bonus treat, there are some rather pretty pictures too! Do let me know how you get on! You can tweet me, catch me on instagram or you can email me.

SIGN UP FOR “HOW TO SLEEP” HERE!

The Epic Fantasy Quester’s Guide to Extreme Health!

The Epic Fantasy Quester’s Guide to Extreme Health!

My favourite works of fiction, the pieces I return to again and again to escape from the stresses and the anxieties of mortgage payments, social media bombardment and noisy police sirens, are invariably the long and multi-volume tales of Epic Fantasy novels (usually lent or given to me by my father @calmgrove.) You know the general plotline – young protagonist gets plucked from obscurity to fulfil their destiny on a long quest of hardship across many and varied lands while meeting wise folk who support them in discovering their unique powers and challenging the entire balance of the (fictional) world they live in. (Apologies for that ridiculously long sentence there!)

I have realised recently that my love of these books have actually helped shape many of my health philosophies! This may seem odd – I am qualified in nutritional therapy after all – but, when you finish laughing (it’s ok, I don’t mind) please hear me out…

Our heroes (both female and male; and generally at least part human) do not acquire their powers without a significant amount of multi-terrain and multi-climate walking, climbing and riding; while carrying heavy packs, learning to wield swords or crossbows; bathing in icy lakes, sleeping on the ground, and spending many hours in direct sunlight without sunblock. Find me better ways to build muscle, stamina and immunity and I’ll eat my (wizards) hat! Air conditioned gyms have nothing on the training conditions on mountains, and in broiling deserts, swamps, forests and underground caves!

If you want to develop a strong, athletic physique with superhuman stamina worthy of taking any voyage of hardship across the varied landscapes of Tolkien‘s infamous Middle Earth, Croggon‘s utterly brilliant Pellinor or any other fantabulous worlds dreamed up by the likes of Le Guin, McKillip or Eddings then Katy Bowman of Nutritious Movement, Erwan Le Corre of MovNat, Wim Hof of the Wim Hof Method and Mark Sisson of marksdailyapple have all written eloquently and extensively on the benefits of all things outdoorsy-and-becoming-superhuman. I am a huge fan of all these health pioneers, albeit largely from the comfort of my sofa. And if I had to go on a legendary quest I would totally seek each of these wise teachers out for my training!

But my area of expertise is that of nutrition. What do our heroes eat on their extreme expeditions when they aren’t on an HGF (human-growth-factor) stimulating fast and missing out on both first and second breakfasts? They stop at good inns for herb-infused rich stews of meat and vegetables or bad inns for stews of collagen-rich gristly meat and vegetables – Paleo enthusiasts eat your (organic and pasture raised) hearts out! Kindly allies, from kings to farmers treat our weary travellers to (sourdough) bread with fresh salted butter and fragrant raw honey served with creamy raw goats milk. Artisanal produced beer and wine flows aplenty All the phytonutrient, probiotic and enzyme rich simple rustic fare you could wish for.

Every time our protagonists reach ports or fishing villages they get to top up their omega 3s with fresh grilled and salted fish stuffed with leafy herbs and citrus fruit slices; and at most other towns they fill their travelling packs with protein-rich dried meat, handfuls of (non GMO) grain and beans (for making soup on hastily assembled campfires obvs) and black bread (probably rye sourdough.) En route through woods they supplement with foraged nuts and berries or bring down small game to appease their hunger and requirements for essential A, D and K2 vitamins.

Even the desserts served in desert tents are super healthy – I think you can take it as read that the (seasonal) fruit will not have been heavily sprayed with glycophosphate or the sweetmeats fried in hydrogenated vegetable fats and drowned in high fructose corn syrups… Everything sings of fresh, organic, pesticide-free and un-processed fare; and I have yet to read of a quester packing tubs of protein shakes, cartons of low fat margarines, shrink-wrapped iceberg lettuces, tetra-packs of soya milk or blister packs of budget multivitamins? That would be weird right?

And do our travellers stress about the lack of wifi connection or bemoan missing their latest legal-thriller series while they sing ballads and tell of thousand year old prophesies by a crackling fire? Do they wish for fire-retardant sprayed armchairs, plastic kettles, mass produced artwork and laminate floors when they stay in stone castles filled with rough-hewn oak, hand-blown glass and crafted precious metals; finely illustrated books of leather and parchment; tapestry lined walls, scented linen sheets and fur rugs. Do we pity them their few-and-far-between hot baths filled with herbs, salts and essential oils when we daily lather up with the sulphate ridden contents of plastic bottles behind our nylon shower curtains; or feel relief that we have access to acrylic jumpers and lycra leggings over the made-to-measure sumptuous silks, supple leathers and rich velvets that are laid out for the adventurer before a feast of exquisitely roasted meats and vegetables? I am inclined to think not.

And I know that however much we sympathise with the hardships of that monumental rite-of passage-traveller – the long periods of training, trudging, starvation, fighting, despair, frustration, loneliness and near-death experiences – there are many of us that suspect that this epic-fantasy boot-camp lifestyle might just be worthwhile if those trials shaped us into lean, invincible, sword and magic wielding warriors who are destined to have many-versed musical sagas sung about us for all eternity.

I think there is a health and lifestyle book to be written here. Hell, I’d buy it! But, in the meantime I reckon that many health questions can be simplified into “would (insert your favourite Epic Fantasy Hero here) eat, do or have it?” Ask yourself next time you are unsure about your next diet, fitness or lifestyle purchase or decision and see if you come up with a better option. Let me know…

If you would like to read my monthly health newsletter (which, as yet, is not based on fantasy fiction novels) then please sign up here: https://mailchi.mp/a223a64be201/newsletter-signup

My Brand New Newsletter and Some Spring Veggies!

My Brand New Newsletter and Some Spring Veggies!

Despite the “Beast from the East” plunging the UK back into sub-zero temperatures with its best attempts to fool us into thinking that Winter will be with us for a bit longer – there are signs that tell us otherwise! Can you feel that change? It’s more than the increased daylight hours and more than the daffodils raising their heads above ground. It’s that whisper in your ear to yawn and stretch; to rub the sleep from your eyes and to figure out what to do and where to go today. It’s your creativity starting to resurface after a sleepy hibernation; the desire to start new projects, flex those muscles and to reassert your place in the world.

And with that creative Spring energy in mind I have finally planned and created my first newsletter! It will be a monthly affair; if you sign up you should receive some combination of seasonal health and nutrition tips and a few of my musings and witterings on the first of each month. There will be occasional discounts for my coaching or detox course; easy recipes and answers to any questions that readers might like to send.

If you would like to sign up please  CLICK HERE!

But, in the meantime I thought that you might like some inspiration for how to prepare some of the Spring vegetables that are turning up in veggie boxes over the next few weeks. asparagus-2178164_640

This season’s early produce can sometimes feel a bit dull as you wonder how much more of the heavy winter roots and leaves you can handle. At this time of year home produce will have generally been carefully stored for a few months and veg-box schemes often have to pad out with imported produce. But all is not lost; a little inspiration goes a long way at this time of year!

You can make the most of spring greens stir fried with ginger, chilli and garlic and then dowsed with coconut aminos. Jerusalem artichokes are lovely sliced into coins and roasted with olive oil and plenty of sea salt until the skin caramelises. This is a great time to enjoy sprouted seeds and pulses if you are craving something a bit lighter or you can grate beetroot and carrot to serve with toasted walnuts and a lemony dressing.

Try mashing cauliflower with cream, salt, black pepper and freshly ground nutmeg as an alternative to mashed potato or roasting beetroot until it’s soft and sweet and then serving it with a garlicky yoghurt dressing. Don’t forget that you can make jacket potatoes from sweet potatoes; roast them until really soft and then serve with plenty of butter.

But then, as the daylight hours grow and thoughts turn to shedding a few layers, flavours kick off with all things fresh and exciting. The season’s new, spindly asparagus is lovely lightly steamed and dipped into raw salted butter or soft boiled eggs. Rhubarb makes so many amazing puddings or can even be finely sliced into raw salads. Wild garlic is great shredded and stirred in to a one-pan meat dish just before serving and purple spouting broccoli is delicious steamed and served with plenty of good butter.

If you make any of these do let me know. And if you sign up to my newsletter… see you on the first of the month!!

The Authentically Autistic Health Files: Florence Neville (Me!)

The Authentically Autistic Health Files: Florence Neville (Me!)

The Authentically Autistic Health Files are a celebration of health and wellbeing practitioners who, like myself, are both autistic and working with clients who are autistic. As you might expect, our unique life experiences, understanding and skills give us particular insights into many of the challenges that our autistic clients may have.

Please do contact me if you would like me to send you a questionnaire so that you can be featured on this blog. You are welcome to remain anonymous and I will always get you, as the featured practitioner to approve copy before I post.

As requested by the other practitioners who’ve filled this in already – in my own words, here I am:

Florence Neville: Health and Nutrition Coach

florenceneville.com

Basic Biography

Although I have had a lifelong interest in health and nutrition (I remember secretly musing on diet plans for my peers when I was only eight years old and my earliest career choice was to be a doctor or nurse!) I actually trained in and gained my degree in music; meaning that my twenties were spent performing, recording, teaching and managing the shop for a violin workshop.

I left the field of music in order to focus on bringing up my daughters in my early thirties and studied for my Diploma in Natural Nutrition when they began school. Unfortunately not long after qualifying I had a breakdown which crushed any confidence I had to feel able to offer advice. Instead I took a job at my local pharmacy – a job that, while it taught me a great deal, was highly unsuitable to my neurotype.

Despite, in retrospect, clearly fitting the criteria I had no idea that I might be autistic until a chance reading of this article by Sarah Hendrickx in April 2016. Luckily I was able to get an appointment with her soon after and was given a diagnosis of Aspergers within the month. A complete reassessment of my life and then learning to work to my autistic strengths gave me a boost in both understanding and confidence, resulting in me feeling able to leave my pharmacy job and re-start my nutrition practice in the Autumn of 2017.

Your Health Business or Specialism

Over the years I have thoroughly researched and experimented with various dietary models including vegetarian, low fat, low calorie, vegan, raw vegan, wheat/dairy/sugar free, paleo, primal, low carb, zero carb and traditional. They all have their pros and cons, but the crucial point is that not one of them is suitable for everyone at all times. What suits me may not suit you, and what suits me now may not suit me in ten years.

So, part of my job is to really get to grips with an individual’s nature and nurture make-up in order to be able to provide a set of guidelines that will enable them to heal most effectively given their genetics, symptoms, lifestyle, budget, and geography. Most of these guidelines will be dietary but helping them to understand how to use light, movement, sleep and rest patterns are also crucial. Seeing a client’s health and wellbeing transform is an incredible honour and I find it really exciting.

How Does Being Autistic Impact Your Health Practice?

I think that my neurotype gives me a specific and unique skillset to work with. I love to research and I am good at spotting patterns, or indeed spotting broken patterns in a client’s health in a way that conventional medicine is not always able to. For instance, if a client is experiencing a difficult menopause I am looking to balance her hormones but I am also working out why that imbalance occurred in the first place; it might be that her adrenal system is overtaxed or that she isn’t eating enough of the building blocks to support progesterone production; it might be that she is eating too many oestrogen mimicking foods or that her liver is overloaded; maybe it’s an emotional issue or perhaps the symptoms are actually due to something else altogether.

I like being able to break down a complex issue and offer it back to an individual in a way that is both easier to understand and gives them the practical tools necessary to work with their symptoms. My role is largely to educate and empower. I have noticed that many autistic people have a unique skill in this area. We don’t tend to accept what we are taught at face value but instead tend to take a different route when internalising a collection of information. “Why?” is of more interest than “What?” when we are figuring out “How?” and so we love to explain how we got to that answer. Having said that, it’s not so easy to explain when we suddenly just know the correct answer without any apparent route whatsoever!

What Considerations Do You Take into Account with Autistic Clients?

My autistic clients tend to have thoroughly researched their own health issues well before making the decision to book a consultation with me. They have often been repeatedly fobbed off by doctors who have not been able to spot patterns and so have tried to self-treat (or just ignored) symptoms on an individual basis. As autistic clients tend to have a more complicated health picture than non-autistic clients I tend to have more “knot unravelling” to do.

I have also noticed a tendency for autistic clients to apologise at the outset for being blunt, outspoken and needing to be given a lot of background information. In fact, this is how I much prefer to work – these qualities make my job easier!

While I don’t seek to treat autistic clients differently I am still learning quite how wide the range of executive function challenges are from one client to the next. This is why a dialogue is so important – it’s not appropriate to just issue information and a set of recommendations based on what will make the most difference to an individual’s health if they will be overwhelmed by the information and not do any of it. Meanwhile some clients prefer to jump in at the deep end from the outset.

Do You Have or Have You Had Specific Health Challenges of Your Own?

Over the years my own health challenges have included anxiety, depression (including five major breakdowns,) insomnia, chronic constipation, compulsive eating, acne into my late thirties, frequent and extreme bouts of fatigue, multiple bouts of tonsillitis (including emergency surgery for quinsy,) asthma, aching joints and frequent lung infections.

I find that, for me personally, all of these have responded well to a diet based on healthy fats, organic vegetables and meat; and well sourced supplements together with some lifestyle changes and certain naturopathic techniques. I am in better health now, in my mid-forties, than I have been at any other time of my life! I also see an amazing acupuncture and zero-balancing practitioner in Bristol and she has worked miracles when I need extra support.

What Are Your Own Health and Wellbeing Routines and Non-Negotiables?

I require a great deal of down-time. Clean air, sunlight, organic and minimally processed foods; eight hours sleep, walking and periods of silence are crucial for me to remain physically and emotionally healthy. Paying attention to the seasons in terms of food and lifestyle keep me connected and grounded. Working with varying energy levels over the course of my menstrual cycle is vital. And, while I don’t drink much, really good coffee makes me feel good!

Sensory Toolkit

The autistic community is generous with tips on navigating the outside world. I learned a lot from my Twitter friends! Since I learned to keep a “toolkit” in my bag at all times then being out and about causes far less stress. My kit includes both blue-blocking glasses (for the rare occasion that going into a fluorescently lit supermarket or department store is unavoidable), sunglasses, ear-plugs, headphones, rescue-remedy spray and a hanky doused with essential oils.

Meltdowns and Shutdowns

My meltdowns and shutdowns are rare these days but are generally triggered by being overwhelmed (social and/or sensory), by intake of junk food or by mould exposure. I need to be able to escape either to a quiet and dark safe place or into nature; I need calm reassurance (because I am generally frightened by my reaction) and I need grounding. It will often take me several hours or even days to recover, during which I will likely be mute and unable to pull my face into any kind of expression. I have been incredibly lucky that my husband has never once assumed my reactions to be tantrums and sulking and has always instinctively known how to support me.

What Are Your Plans?

I am really excited that there is now a growing understanding that nutrition, done right, can support autistic people to truly thrive and play to their own incredible strengths; and I love that I have the opportunity to help drive that forward in my practice.

My pie-in-the-sky dream is that one day I can be part of a linked practice that brings together autistic practitioners (nutrition, bodywork, herbalism, coaching etc.) with someone who can effectively deal with the day to day stuff (answering the phone, appointment setting and dealing with the finances) for those of us with executive functioning issues. Maybe one day…

Who Are Your Health Inspirations?

So, so many… I am always inspired by people who push the boundaries in health fields. I would recommend reading anything by Nora Gedgaudas or Dr. Christine Northrup. I love listening to the range of guests on the podcasts The Lifestylist, Bulletproof Radio and ReWild Yourself. Mark Sisson’s website is a fantastic resource.

Do You Have any General Advice or Closing Words?

Balancing rest and play is crucial. I hibernate in winter so that I am more able to get outside and be part of things in the summer. If I have been sociable on any one day then I will need at least one day to recover. A good night’s sleep is crucial if I am to be able to even speak to anyone the next day but that sleep is only possible if I have nourished myself well during the day.

 

Flo in Full Flow…

Flo in Full Flow…

Sorry, that is a ridiculously cheesy post title. Please forgive me…

Well, it’s nearly four weeks since I left my job and it feels good! My asthma has calmed down, my joints are aching and creaking less; my energy is gradually increasing and the brain fog is lifting. Boom! See ya evil black mould!!

The knock on effect of the brain fog lifting has been that I have been able to start doing some more concentrated work on my business florenceneville.com and producing some information sheets for clients. I had forgotten the complete bliss of losing three hours at a stretch in flow state. I have written info sheets on Autumn Health Support, Sleep Tips, An Introduction to Cortisol and also Ten Ways You Can Support Your Cortisol Cycle; and I have loved writing every one!

I also noticed today that I have forgotten to drink coffee for the last few days. Forgotten! I have instead been experimenting with blending up some gorgeous elixirs with ingredients like dandelion coffee (from Paula Grainger and Karen Sullivan’s beautiful book Infuse), butter, nut butter, raw honey, cacao and maca root powder. Can I just say, right now, that this combination beats the taste of any hot chocolate I have ever had? And that, in the interest of full disclosure, I have drunk a LOT of hot chocolate in my time? I shall try and remember to measure the amounts next time so that I can give you a recipe!

Right. Flow state is all very well and good but I have now been at the laptop for four hours and that just ain’t healthy. Time to do such mundane but vital stuff as dragging the vacuum cleaner around the house, walking the dog and making some lunch. On which note, can I just tell you my major foodie revelation for the week? Brussels Sprouts, which I normally loathe, are really, really good when roasted in plenty of pork lard and with a liberal dusting of sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Peace out…. xx

 

Autism South West 2017 and A Shameful Tale

Yesterday I got to speak about “Sugar, Stress and the Spectrum” at the Autism South West conference. Specifically I was building on Dr. Luke Beardon’s excellent equation: 

Autism + Environment = Outcome

to explain how internal stressors (internal environment,) such as high or erratic cortisol levels, change the outcome for any autistic person. 

Let me explain. Now it’s pretty well known that being in a supermarket (an external environment stressor) is highly stressful for autistic people (maybe for you too, but definitely if you are autistic.) When somebody is stressed their adrenals ramp up production of the hormone cortisol which raises blood sugar levels in order to deal with threats. (If you have to run away from a lion – you need glucose in your bloodstream to fuel that race for your life.) But unfortunately your body doesn’t distinguish between real or perceived threats. It just acts without question. 

What else happens when your cortisol is raised? Here’s one of my slides:

Now, think how difficult navigating a simple supermarket shop might be when your brain is affected like that… (This is why my shopping gets done online!) Imagine living in a world where a great deal of your environment causes the outcome of reduced abilities to remember, to regulate your mood and behaviour, to organise yourself and make good judgements?

Next in my talk we discussed how consuming excess carbohydrates quickly raises blood sugar levels, causing the body to employ insulin in order to reduce potentially dangerous levels. And then, because your body likes balance, it fires up our friend cortisol again, because low blood sugar is also a threat! The low blood sugar is an internal environment stressor. 

As far as autistic anxiety is concerned: being hunted by a lion = going to the supermarket = low blood sugar!

Anyway, we covered some other useful stuff too but, in the interest of brevity, that’s probably enough for you to understand my shameful behaviour yesterday evening. Shameful because I am a nutrition and health coach. Please don’t judge…

So the conference was fab! Well organised and with brilliant key-note speeches (Sarah Hendrickx and Dean Beadle) that made me both laugh and cry. But, you know, a conference is still a difficult environment for an autistic to navigate. And so my cortisol levels were pretty high…

Now I knew I had a fridge full of delicious and nutritious organic veg and meat at home. I could have rustled something nourishing up in 30 minutes flat. But my memory and good judgement failed me and I demanded we stop off at tesco for ready made pizza (the shame.) And I looked at those huge, insipid, crappy pizzas and could not for the life of me work out how many we’d need and which types we, as a family, would like. My husband found me crying in the chilled aisle and took over. At which point I wandered off and filled the basket with packets of biscuits. I had acted out my own talk perfectly! My high cortisol response had perfectly reflected my slide’s bulletpoints! Oh the irony…

A few things:

  1. If you’d like me to come and talk about diet and autism please contact me here. (Rest assured that I will prepare my evening meal in advance for future talks.)
  2. I didn’t actually eat the biscuits. I was asleep soon after the pizza!
  3. I’m not really ashamed of my choices yesterday. I’ve learned not to blame myself in those situations and am taking care to rest my adrenals today.